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Locals react to immigration deal

By Megan Terlecky, News Channel 3 Anchor & Reporter, megan.terlecky@kesq.com
Published On: Jan 28 2013 06:55:11 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 28 2013 10:13:16 PM CST
PALM SPRINGS, Calif. -

In the Coachella Valley people are cautiously optimistic about a new blueprint to rewrite the nation's immigration laws.

Even though there is still a long way to go before the bipartisan Senate group's ideas become a reality, people are glad the ball is finally rolling.

Gildardo Capistrano, an illegal immigrant, says, "It's everything for us.

Capistrano says he wants nothing more than his kids to succeed.  "That is the reason I come here, a better future for my two kids," he said.

He says a path to citizenship will make all the difference in the world.

"It's very important to us because, it's a better job, no hiding, and working."

Jasmine Roman is a U.S. citizen but her fiance, who is the father of her children, is not.

"He came in the U.S. illegally, so we are trying to see how he can become a US citizen and we can live better," said Roman.

The proposed legislation would make that easier.

"I think it would be great, not just for me, but for a lot of people, because there is a lot of non-citizens in the US and we don't live comfortable," said Roman.

Karan Kler, the executive director for Coachella Valley Immigration Services and Assistance, says, "I think this will work for the American public.  This will work for the economy because we have a whole bunch of immigrants, 11 million, who are now going to be paying fines and taxes and basically being rewarded for doing the right things."

But this proposed immigration reform is still far from becoming reality, many details still need to be negotiated.

"As long as we can keep politics out of policy and do what is best for the country and do what's best for all of us as an America public, I think it can work," said Kler.

Roman says she knows illegal immigrants did break the law,  but says everyone deserves a second chance.

"They are coming from another country where they live hard and they are coming to this country to live a better life and they are just here to live and work free and be happy," said Roman.