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La Quinta memorial special thanks to Eagle Scout

Published On: Sep 12 2013 01:52:15 AM CDT
Updated On: Sep 12 2013 11:44:51 AM CDT

 For the first time since the twin towers fell twelve years ago, valley residents were able to remember the anniversary with a piece of the world trade center.

LA QUINTA, Cali. -

 For the first time since the twin towers fell twelve years ago, valley residents were able to remember the anniversary with a piece of the world trade center.

     Eagle Scout Andrew Davis worked for three years, standing on street corners and in shopping centers determined to bring a piece of history to the valley.
     20,000 dollars later, with some help from the city of La Quinta, he gave the community something to be proud of.

     "I'm very proud that I did this," Andrew says. "It took a long time but, it meant a lot to a large amount of people and that's what it's all about."

     It's not just the city that's pleased. The September 11th memorial in New York now has a plaque showing the fifteen foot high sculpture, unveiled this january, and his dad couldn't be more proud.

     "It's amazing," Mike Davis tells us. "Just to have a plaque like this to remember what happened that day and to see it on the wall brought smiles to my face but tears at the same time. It was just amazing, the accomplishment, what Andrew did."

     That plaque is also helping to spread awareness to some valley residents who didn't know about the memorial in the La Quinta civic campus.
     It did with Chris Hodges, who says the attacks on September 11th were a big factor in his decision to join the marines.

     Hodges says, "We went to the nine-eleven memorial in New York City and we actually saw the plaque at this museum and it was pretty amazing to see that and coming out here. She saw it on the way home from work we thought, pay our respects at least."

     And the community did just that on Wednesday, turning out to light candles and remember the day that we will never forget.

     La Quinta Mayor Don Adolph led the ceremony with a speech. He tells us, "We need to remember. And it's more important that our children and our children's children remember so that we never forget what happened. Because we let our guard down and sure enough, it'll happen again."

     Alexis Fidler came out to view the memorial with Chris Hodges. She says, "Everyone is going to look back saying where were you, what were you doing that day and this is the least we could do."